See, The Psychologists don’t think I’m nuts

I have been accused of being.. um.. a dog nut.  I’m not into performance as much as having fun, but I am obsessive about what my dogs eat, what their health is like and yes I’m obsessive about their poo.  My house is FOR my dogs.  I just happen to live there and help run the pack.  The couch is fair game (as long as I’m not on it).  The dogs come snuggle with me in the morning (and push me to get up for a walk!)

There is a futon mattress taking up my living room floor.  I’m practicing my kata in the breezeway. 

I don’t have a kitchen table because then there wouldn’t be room for the feeding stations.

Yeah.. it’s a dogs house.  I have no human children and don’t plan on it.  I can’t crate human children and leave the house.  (Don’t give me the argument that I can’t stay out too late without stressing out my dogs routine.. their routine keeps me sane… as well as gets me out of dinner parties with people I don’t like, mmmkay?)

Shel reads pscyhology today via feed reader.  She forwarded this post on to me.  It takes a while to load, so be patient. 

The gist… in response to his article about Michael Vick, he got a ton of comments.  And it prompted this post: is a dogs life worth more than a humans? 

” [….]  we humans, a single species among millions, consume about 40 percent of Earth’s primary productivity, 40 percent of all there is. This simple number may explain why the current extinction rate is 1,000 times that which existed before human domination of the planet. We 6 billion have simply stolen the food, the rich among us a lot more than others.”

And more:

So do I think that a dog’s life is worth more than a humans? I think that no dog has ever, intentionally, for reasons of selfish greed, destroyed their home like we have ours. I think that yes, there are way too many people on the planet, and while I’m not advocating mass euthanasia (though mandatory birth control sounds pretty good to me), I think before we start saying humans are worth more than dogs, we need to examine exactly what we have contributed to the quality of life for all species on this planet, not just our own.

Read the Full Article here: Psychology Today